GEAR


SiteLock

John C. Doornkamp

Photography 

This is a photography site with a photographic gallery and advice on image processing software, cameras and lenses, a photography blog, and a range of photography ebooks written for the beginner in photography and the advancing amateur.

THE GEAR ZONE

As you go down this list the camera (and lenses) that you ought to aspire to will increase in quality and cost.

For the newcomer to photography, as well as for the amateur wishing to advance their photography, buying or changing their equipment can seem very daunting.


Here I want to provide a step-by-step guide as to how you can go about making your purchases without having (too many) regrets.


1. KNOW YOUR INTENTIONS


   - family or personal "snaps"

   - pictures to send to social media

   - photographs for photo club competitions

   - images for publication

   - prints for a photographic exhibition


2. KNOW YOUR BUDGET


As quality of camera and lenses rises so do their costs (though I will suggest some ways in which you can keep costs down).

Only you can decide where your financial boundaries lie in relation to the equipment that you want/need/


3. UNDERSTAND WHAT YOU ARE BUYING


Do you know the difference between a DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex) camera, a mirrorless camera and a bridge camera?

You cannot make a sensible choice until you do know the differences.


4. FEEL THE CAMERAS IN YOUR HANDS


Different cameras suit different hands. When you have made a short list of the cameras in which you are interested, go to a camera store and feel them in your hands. Comfort in use really matters.


5. YOU DO NOT HAVE TO BUY NEW


It is lovely to have a new camera of your own. However, there is no need to do so if a quality used camera is the only way to stay inside your budget.


6. THE QUALITY OF THE LENS IS VERY IMPORTANT


When you buy a DSLR or a mirrorless camera you also need to buy a lens.

If you buy a 'kit camera' it will come with a standard zoom lens (usually having the focal lengths that you are likely use most).

However, you may well want to have an additional wide-angle lens, or more of a telephoto lens. These will cost you extra. These too can be obtained second-hand, just choose a reputable dealer and obtain a guarantee against faults and repairs.


WHAT TO BUY?


I cannot answer that question for you, but here are a few observations that may help you.


The major manufacturers (such as Canon, Nikon, Pentax, Fujifilm, Leica, Sony, Olympus and Panasonic) have reputations to maintain for making good cameras.


These companies (mostly) also manufacture lenses. However, indepenent lens makers of quality also exist; these include, Sigma, Tamron, Zeiss and Samyang.



WHICH MODELS ARE BEST?


Here are a few suggestions based on the intentions listed at the outset:



MAKE

Modest need for quality - social photography

Medium quality - good prints

High quality essential - Exhibition Display

Canon

EOS 4000D, EOS200D

EOS80D, EOS6D, EOS7D

EOS5D, EOS-1DX

Nikon

D3400, 

D5600, 

D500, D610, D810, D850, Z6

Pentax


K-70, K-3, KP, 

K-1

Fujifilm

X-A5, X-T100, 

X-E3, X-T20, X-T30, 

X-H1, X-T3, X-PRO2, 

Leica


TL2

CL, SL

Sony

ALPHA 5100,

ALPHA 6500, ALPHA 7,

ALPHA 7R II, ALPHA 7RIV, ALPHA 9,

Olympus

PEN E-PL9, 

OM-D E-M10

OM-D E-M5, OM-D E-M1X, 

Panasonic

LUMIX GX800

LUMIX G80, 

LUMIX G9, LUMIX S1R

As for prices, these may vary widely, but (if you are in the UK) you can begin your search at Wex Photo and Video.


Here is the link:

A note about affiliate links can be found here.

Note: a similar table of information on lenses is being researched for publication in the near future.

This website uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you accept our use of cookies.

Accept